Be Happy for Them

Mark 14:6   (KJV)   6 And Jesus said, Let her alone; why trouble ye her? she hath wrought a good work on me.

Mark 14.6 - Be Happy for ThemJesus corrected the people who were trying to trouble or criticize the woman who broke the alabaster jar of expensive perfume and poured it on His head. For others, there could have been a much better use for that perfume; for Jesus, what she did was commendable.

Our sincere expressions of devotion to our precious Lord will not be understood by others. That’s very much expected from the world; majority of them won’t understand our willingness to be totally broken and fully spilled out for God. The surprise comes when the misunderstanding comes from fellow believers. Worst is when they don’t only comprehend our actions, but they criticize us—especially when they do so in public, where the lost are watching.

It’s a joy for us learning from others. We welcome suggestions and differing opinions. It’s wisdom to have multitude of counselors. We can learn even from criticisms—if we can call it as such—especially the constructive, corrective, non-judgmental, and non-condemnatory kind—gentle words birthed out of love. We understand and humbly admit we’re far from perfection. We will make mistakes; we will miss blind spots. We’re grateful when others see what we fail to see.

On the other hand, sad to point out, there are self-righteous/know-it-all people—at least that’s how they esteem themselves. Instead of being irritated, annoyed, and angry with them, we pray for them. We pray for us as well. As people of grace, we pray that we will be gracious towards everyone—especially our families—in this context, our spiritual families. Obviously, we have different expressions of devotion. We may feel like there are better ways, but they may have reasons we’re not privy to. What they do may be better than our preference. And that’s our position regarding our differences: they may know something we don’t. With that, we can just be happy for their love of our Savior.

Healing – The Jesus Way

Mark 5:23   (KJV)   “And besought him greatly, saying, My little daughter lieth at the point of death: I pray thee, come and lay thy hands on her, that she may be healed; and she shall live.”

Jairus, whose daughter was extremely sick—to the point of death, had faith in Jesus. Interestingly, somehow he found it necessary for our Lord Jesus to lay hands on his Mark 5.23 - Healing - the Jesus Waydaughter. It was through such gesture of our Lord that he believed his daughter will be healed.

I don’t ever want to criticize anyone who does things differently in relation to their ways with the Lord. As long as the bottom-line, necessary, non-negotiable doctrine is on target, we celebrate the differences in the body of Christ. To be clear, I had spiritual traditional beliefs and practices I eventually found out were abominable to God. When I thought I was pleasing God and was getting closer to Him, I was incurring curses upon myself. But among true believers, we believe the same essential doctrines. Often, it’s only the expressions of our beliefs that vary.

The woman with an issue of blood for twelve years believed that if she could only touch the hem of Jesus’ garments, she would be healed, and she got healed after she did it. It differed from Jairus’ perceived effective method. Both of them though anchored their faith on the Person of Jesus. And none of their preferred process was anti-God or anti-Scripture.

Laying on of hands for healing–whew. We feel like if we do, we identify with a denominational persuasion where this practice is common. But why hold back? Let’s celebrate those denominations for getting there ahead of us; they’re not our competition, although, sad to say, others treat them even as enemies. Jesus spoke to sickness; He laid hands on the sick. If He did, I guess there’s nothing wrong with it. In fact, many of us have done it, and we’ve witnessed people getting healed. Our faith is in our Great Physician; and we just employed the simple WWJD (What Would Jesus Do) principle in the right context.